Mary, Mary, To The Contrary

I read in The New York Times today that Mary Barra pushed back against China’s aggressive plan to ban the sale of gasoline powered automobiles. In her Shanghai speech, she said:

“I think it works best when, instead of mandating, customers are choosing
the technology that meets their needs,”
(1)

Shame, Mary. Shame. Should we permit customers to choose plutonium powered cars because they would only need refueling once every twenty years? Hey, convenient, quiet, zero emissions. I think not. It’s the old critical mass problem. We’ll probably agree that Governments should control that option. But, if you look at the alphabet soup of Climate Change (2) hurricane names in the Caribbean and the mess they have left (or will leave) behind,  you might think a few plutonium bombs had been loosed down there. That’s not the case, of course, but you know, I know you do, that gasoline powered cars are just slow atmospheric time bombs, and the timer has run out.

It certainly does not work best when customers are choosing their own automobile power technology if that choice chokes us in poison gases, fills the atmosphere with CO2, acidifies the ocean, and blows Florida and its neighbors to the south off the map. Your customers are not equipped to sort through the real facts, industrial propaganda, bullshit, and lies that surround matters like these. They’ve been trained well by Detroit and decognified by political evangelists. We need a some real leadership here. Leadership with brains, not what we have in Washington and Florida now.

How about this, let’s use up what gas cars we have for as long as they run, but make no more. Or not many more. It’s past time. Hell, Cuba did it. We can, too! China is right.

Or, maybe we could build a wall around the country to keep hurricanes out, and evolve leaves to breath CO2.

-George-

  1. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/15/business/gm-china-ceo-gasoline.html?hpw&rref=automobiles&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=well-region&region=bottom-well&WT.nav=bottom-well
  2. In bold and capitalized for Rick Scott, who has trouble seeing or saying those words.