Battle Of The Laundry Clones

Sharon and I went to Lowe’s to buy a top-loading washing machine and dryer yesterday afternoon. We’d had it with the mold jungle growing just inside the door of our front-loader, and it tended to wander out of its assigned space into the lane of traffic in our small washroom.  Our sales person was busy with another customer when we arrived, so we killed time by  comparing the marques on the floor.

The Samsungs and LGs were very different from familiar American names and from each other. Their engineering folks had clearly been at work trying to innovate (over-innovate?). One LG washer had its controls on the front, but the tub was so deep that a smaller person would not be able to retrieve that loose sock at the bottom without entering a set of random commands on those very convenient buttons as they slid over them on the way down into the machine’s maw. I’m guessing the commands would be ignored with the lid up and the operator standing on their head in the tub. Hope so. LG also had a machine with a second mini washing machine underneath the main machine at toy poodle level. That should enable one to start training the kids to do their own laundry at a very early age. Samsung had a washing machine with a pre-wash sink in the lid. Very cool. I wonder if I could clean my paint brushes there? Probably once. But, kudos for trying Samsung and LG, really.

There was a surprise with the American brands. The ones we looked at were not different. Very much not different. In fact, except for tweaks in their rather simple skins and, sometimes, control panels, they appeared to be built from the same parts bins and by the same robots. We noted striking similarities (clone-arities) in visible components from door hinges and latches, detergent and softener trays, filters, and tubs in Maytag, Roper, and Whirlpool washing machines and dryers. Was there anything different deeper inside? Didn’t know. Were they all built in the same factory? One thing is for sure, the American marques did not have controls on the front or mini washing machines underneath. Innovation must take a back seat to cost control in a very long bus where these machines were designed.

Little boxes in the Lowe’s store,
Little boxes made of ticky tacky,
Little boxes in the Lowe’s store,
Little boxes all the same.
There’s a white one and a gray one
And a blue one and a black one,
And they’re all made out of ticky tacky
And they all look just the same.

Sorry, couldn’t help it. (1)

So, I started trying to find out what the scoop was on this apparent washing machine and dryer clone thing. The first thing I noted was that Whirlpool has a link on the Maytag website. A clue? Yep. Maytag and Roper are Whirlpool brands. (2) So is Kenmore, but we did not go to Sears on our machine quest. Sears is another story. All three brands are built in Ohio out of mostly American-made parts. Don’t know about the same robots.

As strange as the washing machine story seems, Whirlpool may have done its marketing homework fairly well. Suspecting all this, although we had not done research yet, we still bought a Maytag. Ticky tacky or good enough was OK in this case. We did not really need a mini washer and we lose enough socks as it is.

-George-

  1. https://people.wku.edu/charles.smith/MALVINA/mr094.htm
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whirlpool_Corporation